An analysis of sea fever poem by john masefield

He then refers to "tough iron" and copper in that order, but goes on to say that copper was the primary means of tilling the soil and the basis of weaponry until, "by slow degrees", the iron sword became predominant it still was in his day and "the bronze sickle fell into disrepute" as iron ploughs were introduced.

The point is that there is this element of pomp and ritual about jokes; even about practical jokes; indeed even about practical deceptions.

And I am disposed to think that, in being a Dickens character, he was in many ways rather preferable to many modern characters. If this were a ruthless realistic modern story, I should of course give a most heartrendering account of how my spirit was broken with disappointment, on discovering that the prince was only a painted figure.

Many felt that Rudyard Kipling was a likely choice; however, upon the recommendation of Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonaldKing George V appointed Masefield, who remained in office until his death in He continued his duties as Poet Laureate; In Glad Thanksgiving, his last book, was published when he was 88 years old.

And, what is still more obvious, to date the occasion does not even begin to deal with the fact. I am sure it was a shop shining with the same lost light of morning; because it was in the same street under the same sky. I no more thought of expecting McCallum More to come in any way into my own social existence, than I expected Graham of Claverhouse to ride up on his great black horse to the front-door, or Charles the Second to drop in to tea.

It was the very reverse of solid respectability; because its ethics and theology were wearing thin throughout.

Analysis of Sea Fever by John Masefield Essay

I cannot remember in the least what she looked like; but I will do battle with anyone who denies her superlative good looks.

Masefield here is an imagist presenting only the pictures, with no explicit connections between them and no commentary on them. But on the other side my mother came of Scottish people, who were Keiths from Aberdeen; and for several reasons, partly because my maternal grandmother long survived her husband and was a very attractive personality, and partly because of a certain vividness in any infusion of Scots blood or patriotism, this northern affiliation appealed strongly to my affections; and made a sort of Scottish romance in my childhood.

I remember once walking with my father along Kensington High Street, and seeing a crowd of people gathered by a rather dark and narrow entry on the southern side of that thoroughfare.

I think this sort of sleepy sanity rather an English thing; and in comparison it may not be entirely fanciful to suppose there was something French, after all, in the make-up of my mother's family; for, allowing for the usual admixture, they ran smaller in stature, often darker in colouring, tough, extraordinarily tenacious, prejudiced in a humorous fashion and full of the fighting spirit.

But it did not, and does not, make me think the other windows and houses were all almost equally interesting; and that is just what the glimpse of the baby's wonderland does. She thought nothing should be wasted; and could not see that even a thing consumed is wasted if it is not wanted. The story of my birth might be untrue.

It involves being in much more than the common sense the stage carpenter, being the architect and the builder and the draughtsman and the landscape-painter and the story-teller all in one. And upon that point, as it happens, I am largely on the side of my schoolmasters against myself. I have some sort of notion now; but I will not mention it at this stage of the story.

There Is Another Sky

Such, so far as I know it, was the social landscape in which I first found myself; and such were the people among whom I was born. But on my father's side also there were legends; the nearest and most eminent figure being that Captain Chesterton, who was famous in his day as a reformer of prisons.

To all these four facts I can testify; exactly as if they were facts like my loving a toy gun or climbing a tree. From that poem is how he got inspired to poetry and that poem had deeply influenced him to turn to poetry.

I have already mentioned how my honeymoon began before the White Cow of my childhood; but of course I had in my time been myself a calf, not to say a moon-calf, in the sort of calf-love that dances in the moonshine long before the honeymoon.

There is no greater thing to be said of God Himself than that He makes things. But I mean that the distinctions I make here were all there; I was not conscious of them but I contained them. Lucretius challenged the assumption that humans are necessarily superior to animals, noting that mammalian mothers in the wild recognize and nurture their offspring as do human mothers.

Autobiography

And, looking back on my life, and the relatively unreal and indirect art that I have attempted to practise, I feel that I have really lived a much narrower life than my father's.

But I fear it is much more probable that the new schools have got rid of the Greek accent by getting rid of the Greek.

And I believe that in feeling these things from the first, I was feeling the fragmentary suggestions of a philosophy I have since found to be the truth. Lines one and two contain the common iambic meter found throughout the poem.Comments & analysis: I must go down to the seas again, to the lonely sea and the sky, / And all I ask is a tall.

An Analysis of the Structure of the Poem Sea Fever by John Masefield PAGES 1. WORDS View Full Essay. More essays like this: john masefield, sea fever, structure analysis. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University.

Exactly what I needed. john masefield, sea fever, structure analysis. Not sure what. This poem about finding a beautiful garden is one of Emily Dickinson's most well known poems.

The precise meaning of the poem is a matter of opinion. One possibility is that she is pointing out that a person may be disappointed in his quest to experience beauty in the world.

However, when we look inside ourselves and one another, we may find a flourishing beautiful garden of delights!

Sea-Fever by John Masefield

John Edward Masefield OM (/ ˈ m eɪ s ˌ f iː l d, ˈ m eɪ z-/; 1 June – 12 May ) English poet and writer, was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from Among his best known works are the children's novels The Midnight Folk and The Box of Delights, and.

John Masefield's poem "Sea Fever" is a work of art that brings beauty to the English language through its use of rhythm, imagery and many complex figures of speech. II.—THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN KEY. The very first thing I can ever remember seeing with my own eyes was a young man walking across a bridge.

He had a curly moustache and an attitude of confidence verging on swagger.

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An analysis of sea fever poem by john masefield
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